Alcohol and inflammation and immune responses: Summary of the 2005 Alcohol and Immunology Research Interest Group (AIRIG) meeting

Русский
Читать онлайн: 
Аннотация научной статьи: 

The 10th annual meeting of the Alcohol and Immunology Research Interest Group (AIRIG) was held at Loyola University Medical
Center, Maywood, Illinois on November 18, 2005. The AIRIG meeting was held to exchange new findings and ideas regarding the profound
suppressive effects of alcohol exposure on the immune system. The event consisted of five sessions, two of which featured plenary talks
from invited speakers, two with oral presentations from selected abstracts, and a final poster session. Participants presented a range of novel
information focused on ethanol-induced effects on innate and adaptive immunity after either acute or chronic exposure. In particular, participants
offered insights into the negative effects of ethanol on the innate processes of adhesion, migration, inflammation, wound repair,
and bone remodeling. Presentations also focused on the means by which ethanol disrupts activation of macrophages and dendritic cells
(DC), especially stimulation mediated by Toll-like receptor ligands. Additional talks provided new data on the means by which ethanol
suppresses adaptive immunity, with an emphasis on DC-mediated activation of T cells, effector T cell activity, and T cell-driven B cell
responses. 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Загрузка: 
Download 121-125.pdf (93.42 КБ)
Текст статьи: 

Review
Alcohol and inflammation and immune responses: Summary of the 2005
Alcohol and Immunology Research Interest Group (AIRIG) meeting
Thomas J. Waldschmidta,*, Robert T. Cooka, Elizabeth J. Kovacsb
aDepartment of Pathology, The University of Iowa, Carver College of Medicine, 1038 ML, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA
bDepartment of Surgery, Burn and Shock Trauma Institute, Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, IL 20153, USA
Received 17 April 2006; received in revised form 4 May 2006; accepted 5 May 2006
Abstract
The 10th annual meeting of the Alcohol and Immunology Research Interest Group (AIRIG) was held at Loyola University Medical
Center, Maywood, Illinois on November 18, 2005. The AIRIG meeting was held to exchange new findings and ideas regarding the profound
suppressive effects of alcohol exposure on the immune system. The event consisted of five sessions, two of which featured plenary talks
from invited speakers, two with oral presentations from selected abstracts, and a final poster session. Participants presented a range of novel
information focused on ethanol-induced effects on innate and adaptive immunity after either acute or chronic exposure. In particular, participants
offered insights into the negative effects of ethanol on the innate processes of adhesion, migration, inflammation, wound repair,
and bone remodeling. Presentations also focused on the means by which ethanol disrupts activation of macrophages and dendritic cells
(DC), especially stimulation mediated by Toll-like receptor ligands. Additional talks provided new data on the means by which ethanol
suppresses adaptive immunity, with an emphasis on DC-mediated activation of T cells, effector T cell activity, and T cell-driven B cell
responses. 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Keywords: Alcohol; Inflammation; Immunology; Dendritic cells; Macrophages; Cytokines
1. Introduction
It is increasingly clear that alcohol abuse has a major impact
on both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune
response. The innate immune system is designed to prevent
colonization of tissues by pathogens and consists of granulocytes,
monocytes/macrophages, and natural killer cells.
Adaptive immunity is focused on eliminating organisms
that have penetrated sterile portions of the body, and uses
B cells and T cells that have been alerted to the presence
of pathogens by dendritic cells (DC). Ethanol-induced dysfunction
within the immune system has a range of deleterious
effects on human health, including major elevations in
the rates of infectious disease (Cook, 1998; Happel & Nelson,
2005; MacGregor & Louria, 1997; Nelson & Kolls,
2002; Szabo, 1999). Investigators are not only making
progress documenting the nature and range of immune lesions,
but are also beginning to identify the means by which
ethanol exposure leads to impairment. This is particularly
true with innate immunity, where current research is
leading to a better understanding of alcohol-induced
dysfunction in granulocytes, macrophages, and DC as
well as innate processes such as leukocyteeendothelial
interactions, inflammation, and tissue remodeling (Happel &
Nelson, 2005; Messingham et al., 2002; Nagy, 2003).
Although it is well understood that long-term alcohol
abuse severely damages immune function, the field of
alcohol research has gained an appreciation that acute
ethanol exposure in the form of binge drinking can also compromise
protective immunity (Bagby et al., 1998; Boe et al,
2003; D’Souza et al., 1995; Faunce et al., 2003). However,
the means by which acute and chronic ethanol exposure
disrupt the immune system are likely to differ, with acute
or binge drinking having a prominent effect on innate immunity
and long-term intake leading to alterations in both the
innate and adaptive systems. As such, greater attention is
being given to the development and characterization of
animal models that mimic acute versus chronic alcohol
abuse. Using these models, researchers in the field are becoming
better equipped to approach mechanistic questions.
To further explore these issues, the 10th meeting of the
Alcohol and Immunology Research Interest Group (AIRIG)
was held at Loyola University Medical Center on November
18, 2005. The meeting was supported by an R13 grant from
the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
* Corresponding author. Tel.: þ1-319-335-8223; fax: þ1-319-335-
8453.
E-mail address: thomas-waldschmidt@uiowa.edu (T.J. Waldschmidt).
0741-8329/06/$ e see front matter 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
doi: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2006.05.001
Alcohol 38 (2006) 121e125

Комментировать